For veterans with early-stage prostate cancer, patient age and tumor risk were found to be more strongly associated with use of expectant management than patient comorbidity, a new study published online ahead of print in the journal Cancer has shown.1

Although aggressive treatment can result in bothersome urinary and sexual adverse events without providing significant survival benefit for certain men with low-risk prostate cancer, expectant management is under-utilized. Therefore, researchers sought to evaluate the association between various factors and expectant management use among veterans with early stage prostate cancer.

Results showed that expectant management use was more common for patients 75 years or older and those with low-risk tumors.


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Compared with the 27% of patients younger than 55 years who received this approach, 40% of those 75 or older received expectant management. Similarly, 49% of patients with low-risk tumors received expectant management compared with only 20% of those with high-risk tumors.

Researchers found no association between patient comorbidity and expectant management use or any association between facility factors and use of expectant management (P>.05).

The study demonstrated, however, that receipt of expectant management varied significantly across individual facilities among ideal candidates for expectant management (P<.001).

“Research determining the basis of this variation, with a focus on providers, will be critical to help optimize prostate cancer treatment for veterans,” the authors conclude.

REFERENCE

1. Filson CP, Shelton JB, Tan HJ, et al. Expectant management of veterans with early-stage prostate cancer [published online ahead of print November 5, 2015]. Cancer. doi:10.1002/cncr.29785.

For veterans with early-stage prostate cancer, patient ageand tumor risk were found to be more strongly associated with use of expectantmanagement than patient comorbidity, a new study published online ahead ofprint in the journal Cancer hasshown.1

 

Although aggressive treatment can result in bothersomeurinary and sexual adverse events without providing significant survival benefitfor certain men with low-risk prostate cancer, expectant management isunder-utilized. Therefore, researchers sought to evaluate the associationbetween various factors and expectant management use among veterans with early stageprostate cancer.

 

Results showed that expectant management use was more commonfor patients 75 years or older and those with low-risk tumors. Compared withthe 27% of patients younger than 55 years who received this approach, 40% ofthose 75 or older received expectant management. Similarly, 49% of patientswith low-risk tumors received expectant management compared with only 20% ofthose with high-risk tumors.

 

Researchers found no association between patient comorbidityand expectant management use or any association between facility factors anduse of expectant management (P>.05).

 

The study demonstrated, however, that receipt of expectantmanagement varied significantly across individual facilities among idealcandidates for expectant management (P<.001).

 

Researchdetermining the basis of this variation, with a focus on providers, will becritical to help optimize prostate cancer treatment for veterans,” the authorsconclude.

 

REFERENCE

Filson CP, Shelton JB, Tan HJ, et al. Expectantmanagement of veterans with early-stage prostate cancer [published online aheadof print November 5, 2015]. Cancer.doi:10.1002/cncr.29785