Findings from two large randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials, the Calcium Polyp Prevention Study (14, 15) and the European Cancer Prevention Organisation Intervention Study (16) showed that daily supplementation with 1200 to 2000 mg elemental calcium was associated with a reduced risk of recurrence of colorectal polyps known as adenomas in both men and women. Adenomas are thought to be the precursors of most colorectal cancers. In these trials, individuals who previously had one or more large adenomas removed during colonoscopy were randomly assigned to receive calcium supplementation or a placebo, and the rates of polyp recurrence and other factors were compared between the groups.

The Calcium Polyp Prevention Study involved 930 participants who were randomly assigned to receive 3 grams of calcium carbonate (1200 mg elemental calcium) daily for 4 years or a placebo and then receive follow-up colonoscopies approximately 9 months later and again 3 years after that. Compared with those in the placebo group, the individuals assigned to take calcium had about a 20 percent lower risk of adenoma recurrence (14, 15).


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The European Cancer Prevention Organisation Intervention Study involved 665 participants who were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: 2 grams of elemental calcium daily (from calcium gluconolactate and calcium carbonate), 3 grams of fiber supplementation daily, or a placebo (16). The results showed that calcium supplementation was associated with a modest reduction in the risk of adenoma recurrence, but this finding was not statistically significant.

The results of another clinical trial conducted as part of the Women’s Health Initiative showed that supplementation with 1000 mg elemental calcium (from calcium carbonate) per day for an average duration of 7 years was not associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer (5). The calcium supplements in this trial also contained vitamin D (400 international units [IU]). During the trial, 128 cases of invasive colorectal cancer were diagnosed in the supplementation group and 126 cases were diagnosed in the placebo group.

In 2007, the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) published the most authoritative review of existing evidence relating food, nutrition, and physical activity to cancer risk. The report concluded that calcium probably has a protective effect against colorectal cancer (17).

Is there evidence that calcium can help reduce the risk of other cancers?

The results of some studies suggest that a high calcium intake may decrease the risk of one or more types of cancer, whereas other studies suggest that a high calcium intake may actually increase the risk of prostate cancer.

In a randomized trial that included nearly 1,200 healthy, postmenopausal Nebraska women, individuals were randomly assigned to receive daily calcium supplementation alone (300–600 mg elemental calcium), calcium supplementation (300–600 mg elemental calcium) combined with vitamin D supplementation (1000 IU), or a placebo for 4 years (18). The incidence of all cancers combined was approximately 60 percent lower for women who took the calcium plus vitamin D supplements compared with women who took the placebo. A lower risk of all cancers combined was also observed for women who took calcium supplements alone, but this finding was not statistically significant. The numbers of individual types of cancer diagnosed during this study were too low to be able to draw reliable conclusions about cancer-specific protective effects.

The results of some but not all studies suggest that a high intake of calcium may increase the risk of prostate cancer. For example, the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition analyzed the intakes of animal foods (meat, poultry, fish, dairy products, etc.), protein, and calcium in relation to prostate cancer risk among more than 142,000 men and found that a high intake of protein or calcium from dairy products was associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer (19). Calcium from nondairy sources, however, was not associated with increased risk (19). In addition, a prospective analysis of dairy product and calcium intakes among more than 29,000 men participating in the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial showed increased risks for prostate cancer associated with high dietary intakes of calcium and dairy products, particularly low-fat dairy products (20). Calcium from supplements was not associated with increased prostate cancer risk (20). In contrast, results from the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study showed no increased risk of prostate cancer associated with total calcium, dietary calcium, or supplemental calcium intakes (14, 21).

Other studies have suggested that intakes of low-fat milk, lactose, and calcium from dairy products may reduce the risk of ovarian cancer, but this risk reduction has not been found in all studies (14, 22).

An analysis from the Nurses’ Health Study that included more than 3,000 women found that higher calcium intakes (more than 800 mg per day) from dairy products—particularly low-fat or nonfat milk, yogurt, and cheese—compared with lower calcium intakes (200 mg or less per day) from dairy products was associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer among premenopausal but not postmenopausal women (23). Calcium from nondairy sources was not associated with a reduction in risk (23). Another analysis that involved more than 30,000 women in the Women’s Health Study found a reduced risk of breast cancer associated with higher (1366 mg per day or more) versus lower (less than 617 mg per day) total intakes of calcium among premenopausal but not postmenopausal women (24). In this study, higher versus lower calcium intakes from the diet, from supplements, and from total dairy products were not associated with reduced risk (24).