Terrorist Attack Victims With PTSD Have Higher Cancer Risk

Share this content:
Researchers found a higher prevalence of neoplasms associated with victims of terrorist attacks.
Researchers found a higher prevalence of neoplasms associated with victims of terrorist attacks.

(HealthDay News) -- Among individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), those who were victims of terrorist attacks (TA) have a higher risk for neoplasms than those who experience other traumatic events (OTE), according to a study published online Jan. 8 in the Journal of Neuroscience Research.

Fabio Ferretti, M.D., from Santa Maria alle Scotte University Hospital in Siena, Italy, and colleagues evaluated the association between the type of traumatic event (TA versus OTE) and medical comorbidities among 84 patients diagnosed with PTSD (39 victims of TA, 45 victims of OTE).

Continue Reading Below

The researchers found a higher prevalence of neoplasms associated with TA. For circulatory system comorbidities, PTSD duration was associated with higher prevalence and women were more protected than men. Women had a higher prevalence of neoplasms than men, but female sex was protective against metabolic syndrome.

"Patients with PTSD due to TA and female patients should be considered for their higher prevalence of neoplasms, while male patients and those with higher symptom duration should be monitored for circulatory disease and metabolic syndrome," the authors write.

Abstract/Full Text

You must be a registered member of ONA to post a comment.

Sign Up for Free e-newsletters



Regimen and Drug Listings

GET FULL LISTINGS OF TREATMENT Regimens and Drug INFORMATION

Bone Cancer Regimens Drugs
Brain Cancer Regimens Drugs
Breast Cancer Regimens Drugs
Endocrine Cancer Regimens Drugs
Gastrointestinal Cancer Regimens Drugs
Genitourinary Cancer Regimens Drugs
Gynecologic Cancer Regimens Drugs
Head and Neck Cancer Regimens Drugs
Hematologic Cancer Regimens Drugs
Lung Cancer Regimens Drugs
Other Cancers Regimens
Rare Cancers Regimens
Skin Cancer Regimens Drugs