Robert Hasserjian, Author at Oncology Nurse Advisor

Robert Hasserjian

All articles by Robert Hasserjian

Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma (CHL)

At a Glance Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) comprises about 10% of all lymphomas in North America. It has a bimodal age distribution, with peak incidences between 15 and 35 years of age and again between 65 and 86 years of age; it is rare in children under 10 years of age. The typical presentation of…

Lymphocyte-Depleted Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma (LDCHL)

At a Glance Lymphocyte-depleted classical Hodgkin lymphoma (LDCHL) is the rarest subtype of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL), comprising less than 1% of cases in North America and Europe. It occurs more frequently in HIV infected individuals and in developing countries. LDCHL patients present more often with disseminated disease than patients with other subtypes of CHL,…

Mixed Cellularity Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma (MCCHL)

At a Glance Mixed cellularity classical Hodgkin lymphoma (MCCHL) is a histologic subtype of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL), comprising about 20-25% of all CHL cases. It is seen more often in older adults (older than 55 years of age), in males, and in immunosuppressed patients, as compared with the nodular sclerosis subtype of CHL. It…

Lymphocyte-Rich Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma (LRCHL)

At a Glance Lymphocyte-rich classical Hodgkin lymphoma (LRCHL) is a rare histologic subtype of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) comprising about 5% of all CHL cases. Patients with LRCHL usually present with limited stage (Ann Arbor Stage I or II) peripheral lymphadenopathy. Unlike nodular sclerosis CHL, large tumor masses or a mediastinal mass are infrequent. Systemic…

Nodular Sclerosis Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma (NSCHL)

At a Glance Nodular sclerosis classical Hodgkin lymphoma (NSCHL) is the most frequent histologic subtype of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) in North America and Europe, comprising up to 70% of cases. It is seen mostly in young adults (peak incidence at 15-35 years of age) with approximately equal incidence in males and females. NSCHL is…

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