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Medical futility: Turning 
to the ethics committee

Medical futility: Turning 
to the ethics committee

End-of-life care and decisions can be difficult for health care providers. Consulting the ethics committee can provide needed support for the final decision.

More Reflections

Who called this code?

Who called this code?

Have you ever felt the lasting effect of overhearing an offhand criticism about a clinical decision you made? This nurse reminds her colleagues that they need to advocate for their care as well as their patients.

An extraordinary nursing moment to remember

An extraordinary nursing moment to remember

An opportunity to put basic clinical skills to the test demonstrates the depth of nursing skills for this nurse.

Seeing the forest for the trees

Seeing the forest for the trees

The search for the cause of a patient's fatigue and shortness of breath reminded a nurse to remember the little details in the big picture.

Our pal Joey

Our pal Joey

A young boy is determined to get the answers to questions about his father's radiation treatments, and the treatment team is happy to oblige.

Mr. B.—or why I became an oncology nurse

Mr. B.—or why I became an oncology nurse

A new nurse welcomed the challenge of providing care and compassion to a difficult patient. The experience shed light on why she chose this career.

A human touch can have lasting effects

A human touch can have lasting effects

Past and present come together when, after 20 years, the wfie of a former patient contacts the author with a special request.

The gift of Sam

The gift of Sam

The author describes taking care of Sam, a young patient with osteogenic sarcoma, as well as the valuable lesson she learned from Sam's mother.

When the patient decides: No more treatment

When the patient decides: No more treatment

Clinicians are all too aware that chemotherapy can be either a friend or a foe. When it does become the enemy, supporting the patient's decision to stop treatment often means saying yes to compassionate care.

Everything happens for a reason....

Everything happens for a reason....

When the author takes a cruise to get away from all things cancer, she winds up sharing a room with a woman who teaches her a great deal about dealing with the disease.

What's a mother to do?

What's a mother to do?

The author remembers a young mother with three children and a grim prognosis who hoped for the sake of her family to make it to Christmas.

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