What You Do Not Know Could Hurt You: What Women Wish Their Doctors Had Told Them About Chemotherapy Side Effects on Memory and Response to Alcohol

the ONA take:

Health care providers may not be adequately informing women of common, potentially harmful adverse events of chemotherapy, including memory problems and altered sensitivity to alcohol, according to a study published in the journal Breast Cancer: Basic and Clinical Research.

To explore trends in female experience and awareness of side effects associated with chemotherapy, researchers surveyed 79 women with cancer, including 46 Spanish-speaking women in Puerto Rico and 33 English-speaking women in the continental United States. Most patients had breast or ovarian cancer.

Investigators evaluated rates of reported memory loss or an altered response to alcohol following chemotherapy, whether clinicians discussed potential side effects, and whether patients experienced changes in alcohol consumption after treatment.

Results showed that US women were 7 times more likely than Puerto Rican women to perceive impaired short-term memory, with 90.9% of US women reporting memory problems vs 58.7% of Puerto Rican women. In addition, 28.6% of US patients and 46.7% of Puerto Rican survivors who reported alcohol use said they were more sensitive to lower doses of alcohol.

Despite the high prevalence of impaired short-term memory and altered response to alcohol, the majority of patients wished that they had received information about how chemotherapy and other medications adversely impact memory and affect alcohol response. The findings suggest that additional strategies are needed to improve patient education of potential chemotherapy-related side effects and the benefits and risks of alcohol consumption.

Evidence suggests that most chemotherapy drugs affect healthy cells, including neurons, progenitor cells, and neurotransmit­ters.
Evidence suggests that most chemotherapy drugs affect healthy cells, including neurons, progenitor cells, and neurotransmit­ters.

ABSTRACT: For many patients, a cancer diagnosis is followed by chemotherapy treatment, which works by attacking cells that are growing and dividing throughout the body. Although cancer cells grow and divide more quickly than healthy cells, both are targets. The loss of healthy cells is associated with side effects, such as memory loss and altered response to a variety of food and drugs. In this pilot study, we use the “Survey of female cancer treatments, effects on memory and alcohol awareness” to explore trends in female experience and awareness of side effects associated with chemotherapy. We examined 79 female cancer patients, 46 Spanish-speaking women in Puerto Rico and 33 English-speaking women in the continental United States, and compared the rates of a reported memory loss or an altered ethanol response following chemotherapy, whether or not potential side effects were discussed with a medical professional, and whether they experienced changes in alcohol consumption after treatment. A majority of participants reported having experienced short-term memory loss postchemotherapy. Changes in response to alcohol and an altered sensitivity to alcohol were also reported by 25%–47% of the respondents. Additionally, more than half of all female cancer patients reported that they wished they would have received information on the side effects of chemotherapy and secondary medications prior to treatment. The survey results suggest that medical professionals are not adequately informing women of common, potentially harmful side effects of chemotherapy. Women do wish to be more educated about potential side effects related to memory and alcohol and be given the opportunity to discuss potential outcomes with a medical professional prior to treatment to reduce the negative impact of treatment-related side effects on posttreatment quality of life.


KEYWORDS: alcohol, memory, breast cancer 

CITATION: Couvertier-Lebron et al. What You Do Not Know Could Hurt You: What Women Wish Their Doctors Had Told Them About Chemotherapy Side Effects on Memory and Response to Alcohol. Breast Cancer: Basic and Clinical Research 2016:10 229–238 doi:10.4137/BCBCR.S38389.

TYPE: Original Research

RECEIVED: December 30, 2015. RESUBMITTED: April 12, 2016. ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION: April 15, 2016.

ACADEMIC EDITOR: Dr. Goberdhan P. Dimri, Editor in Chief

PEER REVIEW: Four peer reviewers contributed to the peer review report. Reviewers' reports totaled 915 words, excluding any confidential comments to the academic editor.

FUNDING: We acknowledge the support of Tirtsa Porrata-Doria and the Molecular Biology Core Laboratory and neuroscience behavioral core (Grant RR003050/8G12MD007579-27). The authors confirm that the funder had no influence over the study design, content of the article, or selection of this journal.

COMPETING INTERESTS: Authors disclose no potential conflicts of interest.

COPYRIGHT: © the authors, publisher and licensee Libertas Academica Limited. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons CC-BY-NC 3.0 License. 

CORRESPONDENCE: summer.acevedo@utsouthwestern.edu Paper subject to independent expert single-blind peer review. All editorial decisions made by independent academic editor. Upon submission manuscript was subject to anti-plagiarism scanning. Prior to publication all authors have given signed confirmation of agreement to article publication and compliance with all applicable ethical and legal requirements, including the accuracy of author and contributor information, disclosure of competing interests and funding sources, compliance with ethical requirements relating to human and animal study participants, and compliance with any copyright requirements of third parties. This journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE). Published by Libertas Academica. Learn more about this journal.

 

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