For patients with lung cancer, new method may safely increase radiotherapy dose

the ONA take:

According to a press release in the journal Clinical Oncology, researchers have designed a method that increase the radiotherapy dose administered to patients with lung cancer in order to improve local control and survival while maintaining safety.

 

Researchers at The University of Manchester and The Christie NHS Foundation Trust in Manchester, United Kingdom, are working on a way to personalize the radiotherapy for individual patients while decreasing the risk of harm on healthy tissue.

 

The researchers identified 20 patients with lung cancer to test a new radiotherapy technique called intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Using this method, they found that IMRT can safely increase the radiotherapy dose, which may lead to a 10% improvement in tumor control.

 

Currently, radiotherapy for patients with locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a standard dose, but researchers suggest that that dose may not be enough to inhibit tumor growth and progression. Furthermore, standard treatment of radiotherapy and chemotherapy is associated with poor survival rates. Researchers plan to start a clinical trial to test individualized IMRT in patients with NSCLC.

 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more people in the United States die from lung cancer than any other types of cancer.

For patients with lung cancer, new method may safely increase radiotherapy dose
A method to increase the radiotherapy dose administered to patients with lung cancer.

Manchester scientists are working out how to safely increase the radiotherapy dose given to lung cancer patients - potentially offering improved local control and survival.

Standard treatment for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer is a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Traditionally this is planned in a one-size-fits-all manner but the radiation dose may not always be enough to stop tumour growth. The potential to increase the radiation dose to the cancerous tissue varies between patients and depends on the size and location of the tumour in relation to sensitive organs such as the spinal cord and lungs.

Now researchers at The University of Manchester and The Christie NHS Foundation Trust - both part of the Manchester Cancer Research Centre - have looked at ways to personalise and increase the dose to the tumour while minimising the effect on healthy tissue.

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