Many US women still not taking advantage of cervical cancer screening

the ONA take:

Despite evidence that preventive screening and HPV vaccination can prevent as many as 93 percent of new cervical cancer cases, data reviewed from the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to determine women who had not been screened for cervical cancer in the past five years indicate that 8 million women between the ages of 21 and 65 years of age were not screened for cervical cancer in the last five years. This information was released in a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

In fact, more than half of the new cases of cervical cancer are diagnosed in women who have never been screened or are rarely screened. Some key discoveries from this report include that older women were less likely to be screened as recommended, as were women of Asian/Pacific Island or American Indian/Alaskan Native descent. In addition, while the incidence rate of cervical cancer decreased by 1.9%, the death rate remained stable.

The Principal Deputy Director of the CDC, Ileana Arias, PhD, said increased efforts must be taken to “make sure that all women understand the importance of getting screened for cervical cancer.” One method that may help is for health care providers to address the financial and non-financial barriers that may prevent women from getting screened, thus improving rates of detection and reducing new cases and deaths from the disease.

Current and emerging cervical cancer screening guidelines and tools
8 million women were not screened for cervical cancer in the last five years.

Despite evidence that cervical cancer screening saves lives, about eight million women ages 21 to 65 years have not been screened for cervical cancer in the past five years, according to a new Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than half of new cervical cancer cases occur among women who have never or rarely been screened.

"Every visit to a provider can be an opportunity to prevent cervical cancer by making sure women are referred for screening appropriately," said CDC Principal Deputy Director Ileana Arias, Ph.D. "We must increase our efforts to make sure that all women understand the importance of getting screened for cervical cancer. No woman should die from cervical cancer."

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