Scientists at Scripps Florida find new targets that could increase effectiveness and reduce side effects in breast cancer treatments

the ONA take:

Some breast cancers are driven by receptors that bind estrogen and progesterone. When the hormones bind to these receptors in cancer cells, the cancer cells receive a signal to grow. Scientists found that the progesterone receptor has two activation domains: AF1 and AF2. These findings are important because in some genetic mutations, AF2 is deleted yet the cancer continues to grow using its AF1 domain. Scientists at the Florida campus of the Scripps Research Institute used hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX), a high-precision, high-sensitivity mapping technique, to measure the interactions between the two domains. Scientists hope to investigate the implications for prostate cancer, another hormone-driven cancer.

Scientists at Scripps Florida find new targets that could increase effectiveness and reduce side eff
Scientists at Scripps Florida find new targets that could increase effectiveness and reduce side eff
Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found new targets for potential intervention in breast cancer. Approximately two out of three breast cancers are driven by receptors that bind the hormones estrogen and progesterone - when the hormones bind to these receptors in cancer cells, they signal the cancer cells to grow.
READ FULL ARTICLE From Medical News Today
Loading links....
You must be a registered member of ONA to post a comment.

Sign Up for Free e-newsletters

Regimen and Drug Listings

GET FULL LISTINGS OF TREATMENT Regimens and Drug INFORMATION

Bone Cancer Regimens Drugs
Brain Cancer Regimens Drugs
Breast Cancer Regimens Drugs
Endocrine Cancer Regimens Drugs
Gastrointestinal Cancer Regimens Drugs
Genitourinary Cancer Regimens Drugs
Gynecologic Cancer Regimens Drugs
Head and Neck Cancer Regimens Drugs
Hematologic Cancer Regimens Drugs
Lung Cancer Regimens Drugs
Other Cancers Regimens
Rare Cancers Regimens
Skin Cancer Regimens Drugs