High HDL may reduce risk of prostate cancer recurrence

the ONA take:

According to a new study published in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, researchers at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, North Carolina, have found that high cholesterol may be associated with an increased risk for developing prostate cancer.

For the study, the researchers analyzed blood lipid levels from 843 men diagnosed with prostate cancer who had undergone a radical prostatectomy. All men had no history of taking statin medications that lower cholesterol.

Of all samples, 325 men had abnormal cholesterol levels and 263 had abnormal triglyceride levels. In addition, 293 men had elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, which indicate that those men experienced a prostate cancer recurrence. Men with triglyceride levels above 150 mg/dL were 35% more likely to experience a prostate cancer recurrence compared with men with normal triglyceride levels under 150 mg/dL.

Furthermore, men with total cholesterol levels over 200 mg/dL had a 9% increased risk for experiencing a prostate cancer recurrence for every 10 mg/dL increase over 200 mg/dL. By contrast, men with high levels of high density lipoprotein (HDL) have a 39% decreased risk of prostate cancer recurrence for every 10 mg/dL increase over 40 mg/dL.

The findings suggest that the risk for prostate cancer recurrence may be lowered by controlling dyslipidemia.

High HDL may reduce risk of prostate cancer recurrence
High cholesterol may be associated with an increased risk for developing prostate cancer.

Among men who have surgery for prostate cancer, those who have high total cholesterol and triglyceride levels - two types of fat found in blood - may be at increased risk of disease recurrence. This is according to a study published in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

After skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American men. This year, 233,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, and 29,480 will die from it. According to the research team, including Emma Allot, PhD, postdoctoral associate at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, NC, laboratory studies have linked high cholesterol levels to prostate cancer, but population-based studies looking at this association have been unclear.

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