Disparities in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment based on race, treatment center

the ONA take:

According to new findings published in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology, researchers have found significant disparities for treatment of African American, Hispanic, and community hospital-treated patients for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Specifically, those patient populations were found to be less likely than other patients to receive care for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). For the study, researchers identified nearly 40,000 patients with inoperable stage 1 NSCLC from the National Cancer Database between 2003 and 2011.

They found that African Americans and Hispanics were 40% and 60%, respectively, less likely than others to be treated with either conventional radiation or stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), a technique that delivers higher doses of radiation that requires fewer treatments and is better tolerated.. African Americans and patients without insurance were more likely to receive conventional radiation rather than SBRT if they received radiation at all.

In addition, patients treated in academic hospital were 2.5 times more likely to be treated with SBRT compared with those treated in community hospitals. Patients treated at a high-volume medical center were seven times more likely to receive SBRT compared with those treated at a low-volume center.

Disparities in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment based on race, treatment center
Significant disparities for treatment of African American, Hispanic, and community hospital-treated patients for NSCLC.

African Americans, Hispanics, and those who receive care at a community hospital are all significantly less likely than other patients to receive treatment for early stage non-small cell lung cancer, according to a report in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology.

“We found significant disparities for treatment of a curable cancer based on race, insurance status, and whether or not treatment was at an academic or community hospital,” said Dr. Matthew Koshy, a physician in the department of radiation oncology at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, and lead author of the study.

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