People with lactose intolerance may have decreased risk of breast, lung, and ovarian cancers

the ONA take:

According to a new study published in the journal Nature, researchers from Lung University and Region Skane in Sweden have found that people who are lactose intolerant have a decreased risk for developing breast, lung, and ovarian cancers.

For the study, researchers sought to investigate the possible association between dairy products and the development of cancer. To do so, they designed the study to determine whether low consumption of dairy products in people with lactose intolerance decreases their risk for developing breast, lung, and ovarian cancers.

The researchers identified nearly 23,000 individuals with lactose intolerance from two Swedish national registers. They found that the risks for developing any of the three cancers was significantly lower in people with lactose intolerance compared with to people without lactose intolerance. Incidence rates were similar across different genders and countries of birth.

The researchers also looked at the siblings and parents of those with lactose intolerance and found their risks for developing breast, lung, and ovarian cancers were similar to those of the general population. The findings suggest that patients with lactose intolerance may have a lower risk for those cancers as a result of their diet. The researchers note that the study does not prove cause and effect and further studies are warranted to explain this study's results.

People with lactose intolerance may have decreased risk of breast, lung, and ovarian cancers
People who are lactose intolerant have a decreased risk for developing breast, lung, and ovarian cancers.

Previous studies have shown that there are large differences in breast and ovarian cancer incidence across different areas of the globe. Experts know, for instance, that the highest incidence of breast and ovarian cancer is in North America, Western Europe and Scandinavia, while incidence is lowest in East and Central Africa.

Twin studies and studies of immigrants have suggested that these differences in incidence are due to environmental factors rather than genetic or ethnic differences.

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