Potential biomarkers of early pancreatic cancer discovered

the ONA take:

Patients with pancreatic cancer face a poor prognosis, as only approximately 6% of patients with pancreatic cancer survive more than 5 years after diagnosis.

The low survival rate is primarily because no reliable tools are available to make an early diagnosis, when tumors can be removed before they metastasize. A team at H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, in Tampa, Florida, may have found a potential biomarker for the disease.

Similar to ongoing work at other research centers, the Moffitt team is focusing on microRNAs, small molecules that control many cancer processes in the body.

The Moffitt team focused specifically on microRNAs linked to intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). IPMNs are a type of pancreatic cyst or lesion that can develop into pancreatic cancer the same way precancerous polyps in the colon develop into colon cancer.

These lesions can be seen on CT or MRI; however, imaging studies cannot determine if the lesions are benign or malignant. In addition, surgical resection of the lesions for biopsy can result in long-term diabetes or death. The Moffitt team identified six microRNAs that appeared to differentiate high-risk from low-risk lesions; they also appear to contribute to pancreatic cancer progression.

Researchers are hopeful that these findings will contribute to new ways of detecting the disease earlier and improving the poor prognosis for these patients.

Risk of develop type 2 diabetes may be influenced by blood type
Patients with pancreatic cancer face a poor prognosis, as only approximately 6% of patients survive.
Lee Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, FL, report their findings in the journal PLOS ONE. Only around 6% of people with pancreatic cancer survive more than 5 years after diagnosis. Like work currently going on in other research centers, the Moffitt team focused on a small group of molecules called microRNAs.
READ FULL ARTICLE From Medical News Today
Loading links....
You must be a registered member of ONA to post a comment.

Sign Up for Free e-newsletters

Regimen and Drug Listings

GET FULL LISTINGS OF TREATMENT Regimens and Drug INFORMATION

Bone Cancer Regimens Drugs
Brain Cancer Regimens Drugs
Breast Cancer Regimens Drugs
Endocrine Cancer Regimens Drugs
Gastrointestinal Cancer Regimens Drugs
Genitourinary Cancer Regimens Drugs
Gynecologic Cancer Regimens Drugs
Head and Neck Cancer Regimens Drugs
Hematologic Cancer Regimens Drugs
Lung Cancer Regimens Drugs
Other Cancers Regimens
Rare Cancers Regimens
Skin Cancer Regimens Drugs