Ingredient in common cough medicine may aid diabetes treatment

the ONA take:

An ingredient found in common cough medicine may be able to aid in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in Nature Medicine.

Researchers examined the effects of dextromethorphan, an active ingredient in cough suppressants, in order to build on prior research which showed that it had potential impact on receptor cells in the pancreas. Initially they hypothesized that the compound would actually worsen insulin production.

Instead, the team found that the ingredient caused the receptor cells to boost insulin production in the pancreas.

They tested the effect with a single-dose trial in 20 male patients with diabetes and found that the men “showed enhanced serum insulin concentrations and glucose tolerance.”

Findings, however, are still preliminary, and the researchers advise against diabetics self-medicating with cough medicine. Future testing was encouraged by the team. 

Ingredient in common cough medicine may aid diabetes treatment
An ingredient found in common cough medicine may be able to aid in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes.
A large team of researchers with members from across the globe has found that an ingredient in popular cough medicines may help people with Type 2 diabetes. They have published a description of their research and their findings in the journal Nature Medicine.
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