Low-quality evidence found to support use of cannabinoids for CINV

the ONA take:

According to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, researchers have found moderate-quality evidence to support the use of cannabinoids for the treatment of chronic pain and lower-quality evidence to support their use to treat chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV).

Cannabinoids are the active chemical compounds in marijuana.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from 79 trials that included 6,462 participants. Results of the meta-analysis showed that there was moderate-quality evidence to support the use of cannabinoids for the treatment of cancer pain. Researchers found low-quality evidence suggesting that cannabinoids improve CINV and very low-quality evidence to improve anxiety.

In regard to safety, cannabinoid use was associated with an increased risk of confusion, disorientation, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, euphoria, fatigue, hallucination, loss of balance, nausea, and somnolence.

Long-term marijuana use may cause cancer
Moderate-quality evidence to support the use of cannabinoids for the treatment of chronic pain.
An analysis demonstrated moderate-quality evidence to support the use of cannabinoids for the treatment of chronic pain and lower-quality evidence suggesting that cannabinoids were associated with improvements in nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy.
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