Buccal fentanyl may be valid option during placement of indwelling central venous access port

the ONA take:

Fentanyl buccal tablet is a valid, practical, and safe method of procedural analgesia for patients with cancer during placement of indwelling central venous access systems, a new study published online ahead of print in the journal Supportive Care in Cancer has shown.

Although local anesthesia is most commonly used to overcome pain related to the procedural placement of fully implantable venous access systems in patients with cancer, it may not eradicate all pain. Therefore, researchers sought to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of fentanyl buccal tablet in reducing procedural pain related to the placement of the port in opioid-naïve patients.

For the study, researchers enrolled 65 inpatients who required an indwelling vascular access port. Patients received a 100-mcg fentanyl buccal tablet 10 minutes before preparation of the operating field.

Results showed that nearly 94% of patients experienced no or little pain during the procedure. Only four patients reported a lot of pain, and no patients reported very severe pain.

In regard to safety, 43.1% experienced drowsiness, 9.2% experienced nausea, and 4.7% experienced vomiting, at the end of the procedure. Four hours after the procedure, the rates of drowsiness, nausea, and vomiting were 12.5%, 10.9%, and 7.8%, respectively.

“It will be necessary to perform further studies, taking into account the need for standard antiemetic premedication to [minimize] the incidence of nausea and vomiting,” the authors conclude.

Patient self-report tool on side effects in cancer clinical trials is validated by landmark study
Fentanyl buccal tablet is a valid, practical, and safe method of procedural analgesia for patients with cancer.
Pain in cancer patients is often related to oncologic therapies and diagnostic procedures. The placement of fully implantable venous access systems is a very common procedure in oncology patients. Local anaesthesia is the method most commonly used to overcome pain related to this surgical procedure, but the local anaesthetic may be unable to completely eradicate all pain.
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