Chronic medication use may increase in breast cancer survivors after cancer treatment

the ONA take:

Researchers report an increase in breast cancer survivor’s use of chronic medication after cancer treatment. The study was published online ahead of print in the journal Supportive Care in Cancer.

For the study, researchers sought to characterize the patterns of medication use by survivors of early-stage breast cancer from diagnosis to 1 year after chemotherapy.

Researchers enrolled 107 patients diagnosed between December 2011 and June 2014, all participants were treated at a single center. Medication use data was retrieved from prescription databases and records from the National Electronic Health Records.

Results showed that 46.7% of participants developed non-cancer comorbidities, including hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes.

The most common chronic medication types before chemotherapy were calcium channel blockers and lipid-modifying agents. Their use persisted during and after chemotherapy. The most commonly used post-chemotherapy medication was hormonal therapy.

Researchers found that there was a statistically significant increase in the average number of chronic disease medication classes prescribed to patients between the pre-chemotherapy and chemotherapy periods, as well as between the chemotherapy and post-chemotherapy periods (P < 0.0001).

“This study provides important insights into the design of medication management programs tailored to this population. Future studies should incorporate a control population to improve the interpretation of study results,” the authors concluded.

Many patients modifying medication dosage forms without professional advice
Researchers report an increase in breast cancer survivor’s use of chronic medication after cancer treatment.
The aim of this study is to characterize the patterns of medication use by early-stage breast cancer (ESBC) survivors from diagnosis to 1 year post-chemotherapy. A single-center longitudinal study was conducted with ESBC patients diagnosed between December 2011 and June 2014.
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