Apoptotic Death of Prostate Cancer Cells by a GnRH-II Antagonist

the ONA take:

Gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I) has attracted strong attention as a hormonal therapeutic tool, particularly for androgen-dependent prostate cancer patients. However, the androgen-independency of the cancer in advanced stages has spurred researchers to look for new medical treatments. In this study, researchers investigated the effect of SN09-2 on the growth of PC3 prostate cancer cells. SN09-2 reduced the growth of prostate cancer cells but had no effect on cells derived from other tissues. SN09-2-induced PC3 cell growth inhibition was associated with decreased membrane potential in mitochondria where the antagonist was accumulated, and increased mitochondrial and cytosolic reactive oxygen species. These results demonstrate that SN09-2 directly induces mitochondrial dysfunction and the consequent ROS generation, leading to not only growth inhibition but also apoptosis of prostate cancer cells.

Apoptotic Death of Prostate Cancer Cells by a GnRH-II Antagonist
Apoptotic Death of Prostate Cancer Cells by a GnRH-II Antagonist
by Sumi Park, Ji Man Han, Jun Cheon, Jong-Ik Hwang, Jae Young Seong Gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I) has attracted strong attention as a hormonal therapeutic tool, particularly for androgen-dependent prostate cancer patients. Here, we investigated the effect of SN09-2 on the growth of PC3 prostate cancer cells.
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