In US Hispanics, cancer remains leading cause of death

the ONA take:

Cancer remains the leading cause of death among Hispanics in the United States, according to an American Cancer Society report published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

In “Cancer Statistics for Hispanics/Latinos,” a comprehensive report published every 3 years, Rebecca Siegel, MPH, director of surveillance information for the American Cancer Society, and fellow researchers found that 125,900 new cancer cases and 37,800 cancer deaths are expected among Hispanics/Latinos living in the United States in 2015.

Cancer incidence rates are 20% lower and cancer death rates are 30% lower in Hispanics than in non-Hispanic whites due to a lower incidence rate of the four most common cancers (prostate, breast, lung, and colon). 

However, Hispanics are at a higher risk for cancers associated with infectious agents, such as cancers of the stomach, liver, and cervix.

Lung cancer was found to be the leading cause of cancer death among Hispanic men, accounting for about 17%, or 1 in 6 deaths. According to 2015 estimates, liver cancer is expected to surpass colorectal cancer as the second leading cause of death in this population.

In Hispanic women, the leading cause of cancer death is breast cancer at a 16% death rate, followed by lung and colorectal cancers. Lung cancer death rates were found to be 70% lower in Hispanic women compared to non-Hispanic white women due to a lower prevalence of smoking.

Cancer death rates are declining at a rate of 2.4% per year in men, as well as 0.5% per year in women.

“The growth in the population of US residents of Hispanic origin is now driven primarily by births, not immigration, which will probably change the future cancer risk profile of this group,” said Siegel.

New guidelines address long-term needs of colorectal cancer survivors
Cancer remains the leading cause of death among Hispanics in the U.S.
While cancer is the second leading cause of death overall in the United States, it remains the leading cause of death among U.S. Hispanics. The finding comes from "Cancer Statistics for Hispanics/Latinos," a comprehensive report produced every three years by the American Cancer Society and published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.
READ FULL ARTICLE From Medical Express
Loading links....
You must be a registered member of ONA to post a comment.

Sign Up for Free e-newsletters

Regimen and Drug Listings

GET FULL LISTINGS OF TREATMENT Regimens and Drug INFORMATION

Bone Cancer Regimens Drugs
Brain Cancer Regimens Drugs
Breast Cancer Regimens Drugs
Endocrine Cancer Regimens Drugs
Gastrointestinal Cancer Regimens Drugs
Genitourinary Cancer Regimens Drugs
Gynecologic Cancer Regimens Drugs
Head and Neck Cancer Regimens Drugs
Hematologic Cancer Regimens Drugs
Lung Cancer Regimens Drugs
Other Cancers Regimens
Rare Cancers Regimens
Skin Cancer Regimens Drugs