Quality of Life in Ovarian Cancer Not Diminished by Olaparib

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Olaparib-treated patients had a significantly longer quality-adjusted PFS, researchers found.
Olaparib-treated patients had a significantly longer quality-adjusted PFS, researchers found.
The following article features coverage from the 2017 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago, Illinois. Click here to read more of Oncology Nurse Advisor's conference coverage. 

CHICAGO — Maintenance therapy with olaparib following response to chemotherapy was not associated with a detrimental impact on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) relative to placebo among patients with BRCA-mutated platinum-sensitive relapsed serous ovarian cancer, according to study findings reported at the 2017 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting.

“And despite the toxicity associated with olaparib maintenance, there still were significant patient-centered benefits, and with significantly longer quality-adjusted PFS [progression-free survival] and a significantly longer time without symptoms of disease or treatment toxicity,” lead investigator Michael Friedlander, MBChB, PhD, of the University of New South Wales Prince of Wales Hospital Sydney, Australia, told colleagues.

Using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Ovarian Trial Outcome Index (FACT-O TOI), Dr Friedlander and colleagues evaluated HRQOL and patient-centered outcomes in 295 patients who participated in the phase III SOLO2 trial, which found that patients who received maintenance olaparib therapy had a significantly longer median progression-free survival (PFS) than placebo recipients (19.1 vs 5.5 months; HR 0.30; 95% CI, 0.22, 0.41; P <.0001). The primary outcome of the HRQOL analysis was change from baseline in FACT-O TOI score during the first 12 months of maintenance therapy.

The investigators observed no detrimental effect of olaparib on HRQOL compared with placebo analyzed by change from baseline in FACT-O TOI score (−3.1 vs −2.9, respectively, a difference of −0.2; 95% CI, −2.4, 2.1; P =.88). They also reported a significantly longer time without symptoms of disease or toxicity in the olaparib group than placebo recipients (13.5 vs 7.2 months, a difference of 6.3 months; 95% CI, 2.9-8.6; P <.001). In addition, the olaparib-treated patients also had a significantly longer quality-adjusted PFS (mean 14.0 vs 7.3 months, a difference of 6.7 months; 95% CI, 5.0-8.5; P <.0001).

“SOLO 2 is a trial of maintenance treatment in asymptomatic patients after response to chemotherapy, and quality of life during treatment is of paramount importance,” Dr Friedlander said in an interview. “Patient-centered end points were carefully considered early during the planning of SOLO2 as we felt that it was very important to demonstrate not only a minimal impact of olaparib on HRQOL, but also to include additional quantitative measures of patient benefit to support a PFS gain associated with olaparib.” 

Read more of Oncology Nurse Advisor's coverage of the 2017 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting by visiting the conference page.

Reference

1. Friedlander M, Gebski V, Gibbs E, et al. Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and patient-centered outcomes with maintenance olaparib compared with placebo following chemotherapy in patients with germline (g) BRCA-mutated (m) platinum-sensitive relapsed serous ovarian cancer (PSR SOC): SOLO2 phase III trial. Oral presentation at: 2017 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting; June 2-6, 2017; Chicago, IL.

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